Now Donald Trump Wants to Give Us Advice on Children’s Nutrition?

THE APPRENTICEIf you’re a regular visitor, then you know how I feel about The Trump Network’s dietary supplements.  Not a fan. 

Well now the multilevel marketing company is getting into children’s nutrition.  The new business is called Snazzle Snaxxs. 

Snacks and drinks that will help your kids, not hurt them.” 

You can view the entire sales pitch on SlideShare.  Or click here for a copy of the sales brochure.   These new snacks include BBQ seasoned and Sour Cream and Onion Snazzle Twissters, chocolate bars called Snazzle Barzzs, Cinnamon Apple Protein Puffs (a non-whole grain cereal called Snazzle Puffs), and a variety of fortified beverages, including a grape drink and chocolate vitamin drink (called Snazzle Stixxs and Snazzle Paxxs).  Looks like kids are supposed to eat up to 7 of these snacks a day — “replacing the bad food with the scientifically designed nutrition in great-tasting Snazzle Snaxxs.”

The Snazzle Snaxxs starter kit — one box each of the 11 different products — costs a whopping $248.  You do get a shaker to mix up the drinks and a copy of Dr. David Ludwig’s book “Ending the Food Fight.”   The book is the best thing in the kit.

You would think by the way the brochure is worded that Dr. Ludwig — an esteemed expert in childhood obesity at Children’s Hospital Boston– has granted his blessing on the products.  That couldn’t be further from the truth.


I contacted Dr. Ludwig by email and he confirmed that he is NOT endorsing these products.  He is NOT working with The Trump Network and is NOT not receiving any compensation from the company.  In fact, these are exactly the types of products that Dr. Ludwig is trying to get kids to avoid.

“Nutritionally speaking, our kids have gotten in with the wrong crowd,”  Ludwig writes in Ending the Food Fight.  “Instead of eating foods that nourish them and help them maintain a healthy weight, they have befriended fake food.”

Well, I don’t know anything more fake than these Snazzle Snaxxs.  Yes, they may attempt to add in nutrients, along with some odd enhancements — such as dried broccoli and onion in the grape drink.  But these products are far from real food.  They even try to get their candy bar to look good.  They compare the nutrition information to a candy bar nearly twice the size (of course your bar looks like it has fewer calories and sugar — it’s SMALLER).  And here’s a look at the hefty ingredient list:

Protein blend (whey protein isolate, soy protein isolate, hydrolyzed gelatin, casein, calcium caseinate, whey protein concentrate, milk protein concentrate), sugar, fractionated palm and palm kernel oil, organic cane sugar, maltitol syrup, cocoa powder, glycerin, unsweetened chocolate, water, natural flavors, sunflower oil, enriched flour, mono- and diglycerides, modified milk ingredients, milk mineral concentrate, soy lecithin, fructooligosaccharide, vanilla extract, maltitol, pectin, salt, sodium bicarbonate, sodium phosphate, sodium citrate, carrageenan, sunflower lecithin.  

The Trump Network is gearing up for a major blitz to entice parents into buying these foods for their kids.  You can read more by visiting the blog created by the clinical director of The Trump Network, a naturopathic physician named David Maccallan.

I am not writing this article because I’m vehemently opposed to multilevel marketing (as I’ve been accused by some of the Trump distributors).  It’s the products themselves.  I don’t care how these snacks are being sold, I just don’t want parents to think that they’ve found the answer to improving the diets of their children. 

These are expensive products, fake products and not what we need.  Let’s help parents make smart, affordable choices for their kids — with an emphasis on whole foods, naturally nutrient-rich foods.  Let’s hope parents will get their nutrition advice from qualified health professionals, including registered dietitians, instead of distributors who are financially motivated to move up in the pyramid.

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