Friday Food News

9091825510_d258bfdf28_zSWEET, SALTY AND NOW FATTY: SCIENTISTS WORK TO UNCOVER ‘SIXTH’ TASTE
Via ABC News

Forget sweet or sour, researchers say people may have a “sixth” taste for fatty foods. Researchers out of Purdue University said that the taste of fat dubbed “oleogustus” can be added to the list of distinctive tastes that include sweet, salty, sour, bitter and umami.

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IS MAPLE WATER THE NEW COCONUT WATER?
Via Adweek

Look out, coconut water.  Maple water could be the next big thing.  It’s tapped from trees, but is that a selling point or liability? Drink Maple from Vermont touts:  One ingredient straight from the tree.

KOREAN CUISINE IS A HIT WITH U.S. DINERS
Via ABC News


The spicy, fermented flavors that define Korean food are growing increasingly popular with American consumers. Chefs trained in the cuisine have brought it into the mainstream,
and casual chains including TGI Friday’s have put Korean-inspired burgers and tacos on the menu.

3D-PRINTED CAP CAN DETECT FOOD SPOILAGE
Via Berkeley News (University of California at Berkeley)

Engineers have developed a 3D-printed smart cap that uses sensors to detect food spoilage. “This 3D-printing technology could eventually make electronic circuits cheap enough to be added to packaging to provide food safety alerts for consumers,” said Liwei Lin, a professor of mechanical engineering and co-director of the Berkeley Sensor & Actuator Center, which collaborated on the project with a team from Taiwan’s National Chiao Tung University. “You could imagine a scenario where you can use your cellphone to check the freshness of food while it’s still on the store shelves,” Lin said.

A 3D FOOD LAB AND RESTAURANT WANTS TO TURN YUCK INTO YUM
Via NPR

Dorothée Goffin’s lab in Belgium is outfitted with 3-D printers and digital milling machines. It’s also a kitchen. Goffin is the director of the Smart Gastronomy Lab, supported by the University of Liège and a grant from Creative Wallonia. She and her colleagues aren’t just playing with their food — they also want to figure out how to make 3-D printed foods more palatable to people. The goal, eventually, is to create foods with enhanced nutritional profiles that people actually want to eat. Next year, the Smart Gastronomy Lab will open a “Living Lab,” a space meant to mix innovators and consumers and quickly breed new prototypes. One floor will be a professional kitchen blended with a laboratory. The other will be a self-sustaining restaurant. It’ll double as a consumer testing observatory to see how people respond to certain test recipes that have been 3-D printed in various forms and textures.

3D-PRINTED FOOD WILL ALLOW FOR COMPLETE CUSTOMIZATION
Via The Washington Post

Barcelona-based company Natural Machines is launching a 3D food printer called Foodini that will allow chefs and home cooks to manipulate food in new ways, such as creating pasta in virtually any shape or managing portions precisely. “Eventually, you’ll be able to get a custom meal that looks exactly as you want it, that meets the most ridiculous and precise requirements,” said Alex Lightman, who serves on the advisory board for Natural Machines.  Here’s a video that demonstrates how to make a pizza with the Foodini 3D printer.

FDA WANTS MORE DETAIL ABOUT SUGAR ON FOOD LABELS
Via NBC News and FDA

Food labels should contain more detail about how much sugar is in a product, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration said Friday. It’s proposed a rule to require that food labels not only say how much sugar is in a product, but what percentage the sugar adds to the daily recommended intake. Packages already tell people about the percentage of sodium, fat, cholesterol and fiber. But they just give sugar content in grams, not in terms of daily recommended intake.

HOUSE PASSES BILL TO PREVENT MANDATORY GMO FOOD LABELING
Via PBS

Food companies would not have to disclose whether their products include genetically modified ingredients under legislation passed by the House Thursday. The House bill is backed by the food industry, which has fought mandatory labeling efforts in several states around the country. The legislation, which passed 275-150, would prevent states from requiring package labels to indicate the presence of genetically modified organisms, or GMOs. The country’s largest food companies say genetically modified foods are safe and that labels would be misleading. They say a patchwork of laws around the country would be expensive for companies and confusing for consumers. Advocates for the labels say people have a right to know what is in their food and criticize the legislation for trying to take away states’ ability to require the labels.

A CONSUMER GROUP MORE IMPORTANT THAN MILLENNIALS
Via Food Business News

Move over, millennials. The most disruptive group of future food consumers, according to bestselling author and self-described futurist Mike Walsh, was born in 2007. Not only was 2007 the year of the global financial crisis; it was also the year Apple introduced the iPhone. Mr. Walsh, while speaking during a presentation at the Institute of Food Technologists’ annual meeting and food exposition in Chicago, implored the audience to consider the dramatic changes in everyday life as a result of this technology. The food industry is tasked with engaging the first fully digital generation of today’s 8-year-olds as they become adults, while producing enough food for an estimated population of 9 billion by 2050.

BEHIND THE SCENES OF JETBLUE’S TEST KITCHEN
Via USA TODAY

Video of USA TODAY Travel visiting the JetBlue test kitchen at JFK where chef Brad Farmerie from New York City restaurant Saxon + Parole develops the in-flight menu for the airline’s Mint experience. Mint is JetBlue’s new take on premium flight experiences.

MODERN FARMER TRIES A NEW APPROACH
Via New York Times

Modern Farmer is back, sort of. From its inception in 2013, the magazine and its website drew a small but devoted following who appreciated its quirky attempt to marry agricultural journalism and practical farming advice with fashion and lush, ironic farm-animal photography. Last December, the experiment began to unravel and by January, the last of the paid editorial staff had walked out. But now under the direction of Sarah Gray Miller, the former editor in chief of Country Living, a new team is in place with a fresh take on the brand. Features include articles about the dangers of too much phosphorus, how to save tomato seeds and a shout-out to sorghum, which the magazine calls the new “it” grain. Modern Farmer distributes 100,000 copies per issue, with 80 percent going to subscribers and newsstands and the remaining 20 percent to public spaces and other venues. The magazine says it has a digital audience of 650,000, including social media followers and website visits.

THESE BOSTON FRIENDS JUST MADE TINDER FOR FOOD
Via Boston.com

The concept of new app Tender is simple: it’s Tinder, but for food. The app provides users not just with an endless scroll of the Internet’s food porn, but also their corresponding recipes. If users are interested in the pictured dish, drink, or dessert, they swipe right and save the recipe to their “Cookbook” where they can access the recipe and its original link. If they aren’t interested, they can swipe left to discard the recipe and scroll on to the next one. The app includes filter options for drinks, dessert, chicken, pork, beef, seafood, vegan and vegetarian.

 

Images:  fried chicken by Arisha Singh on flickr, Drink Maple by manufacturer

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